Five Beauty Boosting Travel Tips

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How to stay healthy and keep your skin hydrated on the go

Whether you’re a frequent flyer or getting away for a weekend, pack these derm tested strategies with you

Weather the elements

You don’t need be in the desert to experience a dry climate. Just get on an airplane. “Low humidity in the cabin is extremely dehydrating, so any moisture on your skin will evaporate rapidly,” says Heidi Waldorf MD, a dermatologist in Nanuet, NY. She slathers on a rich face cream (try SeeMe Beauty Uptown Beauty Cream) before a flight, and keeps a little tube of emollient ointment handy to use on lips, cuticles, and dry skin around her eyes or nose. 

Be a clean freak

“Because traveling involves being in heavily used public spaces, I always carry alcohol pads or antibacterial wipes to clean every surface I touch on a plane, in a hotel room, or a rental car. It’s the only thing that’s actually been shown to cut down on getting sick!” Her secret to not getting parched skin from those disinfecting wipes? “I can’t live without an intense hand cream, and I use it without fail at least twice a day and at the start of any flight.”

Moisturize like crazy

“Take along a cleanser and moisturizers that contain humectants such as glycerin and hyaluronic acid that pull moisture into the skin,” says Waldorf. Layer them on (a hydrating serum (like SeeMe Beauty Smooth Out Recovery Serum) followed by a rich cream or lotion, for instance) to keep your complexion dewy.

Avoid dehydrating food and drinks

Try to be aware of getting enough sleep and exercise, doing what you can to reduce stress, and eating a healthy diet when you’re traveling, Waldorf says.. “Be sure to drink more water than alcohol or soda to avoid dehydration in flight, and remember that if you tend to get puffy after eating salty foods, it can be worse in the air.”

Use sun protection always

That also means on planes, trains, or automobiles, because windows don’t block longer UVA rays. The bottom line: If it’s daylight you must wear sunscreen (a broad-spectrum one with SPF 30 or higher). “Not only can sun exposure cause skin cancer, but it also breaks down collagen and creates brown spots,” Waldorf says.